Youth News: Jan-Feb 2018

Youth News: Jan-Feb 2018

YOUTH GROUP LAUNCH BBQ

13 – 18 YEARS OLD?
YOU’RE INVITED TO ST PATRICK’S PAKENHAM’S 2018 YOUTH GROUP LAUNCH BBQ!
Come and see what our youth group is like!

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 24, AFTER 6PM MASS

RSVP TO SIJI ON 0406 062 563 BEFORE FEB 20!

View the Flyer (pdf)


FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT

This was the theme of a day hosted by the new St Thomas the Apostle parish, Clyde North, and was a gratifying experience for about 70 young people.

Below is a testimony of one of our parish youth. “Fight the Good Fight Youth Retreat helped me and many others reconnect spiritually with God, through songs, prayers, dramatised acts, personal stories and experiences. We also took part in various activities including Adoration, Sacrament of Reconciliation and Holy Mass. Towards the end we celebrated with a party! Like many of us, I too enjoyed the retreat and the time I spent there, and hope to attend another”. Aleena Thoppil, Year 9


WESTERN REGION PARISHES YOUTH CONFERENCE 2018

This is the next youth event of our western region parishes – Berwick, Narre Warren, Cranbourne, Clyde North, Pakenham, Koo Wee Rup, Iona/ Maryknoll – and all the youth and young adults of our parishes are invited to a day filled with music, workshops, group discussions, BBQ, worship and praise. This will be at St Agatha’s parish, Sladen Street, Cranbourne on Saturday 17th February, from 9:30 to 4:00pm. Registrations begin at 8:30am. Registrations forms are in our foyer or contact Siji @ 59417315 for further information.

Parish Weekly Bulletin: 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time – 28th January 2018

Parish Weekly Bulletin: 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time – 28th January 2018

We remember those who have died recently including Joan Walker, Renato Bigoni and those whose anniversaries occur about this time including Adonia Castel Eternal rest grant unto them O Lord, let your perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. AMEN.


We pray for those who are sick including Keith Brooks, David Gudgeon, Angel Tan, Calvin Furnell, Richard Pereira, Val Battams Tom Cervasio, Marie Stephen, Deonetta Golja. We pray for all who care for the sick and worry about them. May their works of service be richly blessed. (Names can only be placed on this list by the sick person or a family member).


Click here to view the standard Bulletin (PDF)


BAPTISMS: “Receive the light of Christ. Parents and Godparents this light is entrusted to you to keep burning brightly” (Rite of Baptism). The next Baptism Preparation session is February 4th, 2018 at 2.45pm Read more

Parish Weekly Bulletin: 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time – 21st January 2018

Parish Weekly Bulletin: 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time – 21st January 2018

We remember those who have died recently including Jack Kelly, Joan Walker  and those whose anniversaries occur about this time including Peter Kenny, Daniel O’Driscoll, James, Eileen & Elizabeth Fennell, Fr Joe Flynn Eternal rest grant unto them O Lord, let your perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. AMEN.


We pray for those who are sick including Keith Brooks, David Gudgeon, Angel Tan, Calvin Furnell, Richard Pereira, Val Battams Tom Cervasio, Marie Stephen, Deonetta Golja.  We pray for all who care for the sick and worry about them. May their works of service be richly blessed.  (Names can only be placed on this list by the sick person or a family member).


Click here to view the standard Bulletin (PDF)


BAPTISMS:

This weekend we welcome Aurora O’Sullivan for Baptism. “Receive the light of Christ. Parents and Godparents this light is entrusted to you to keep burning brightly” (Rite of Baptism). The next Baptism Preparation session is February 4th,  2018  at  2.45pm Read more

Multiplatform Journalist Needed (Diocese of Sale)

The Bishop of Sale is seeking to appoint a Multiplatform Journalist for a fixed term of 2 years on a part time basis of 3 days per week (0.6FTE). The position forms part of the newly established Digital Media and Communications Team, reporting to the Bishop through Diocesan Digital Media Manager. The role will be actively involved in contributing content to the development of the Diocese’s new information and news websites. The Multiplatform Journalist will actively seek news stories from around the Diocese and be able to present these stories in written and video format. The position will be based in Warragul and will require travel to Parishes in the Diocese. Read more

Parish Weekly Bulletin: 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time – 14th January 2018

Parish Weekly Bulletin: 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time – 14th January 2018

We remember those who have died recently including Clare Vandenberg, Jack Kelly and those whose anniversaries occur about this time including Anne Vandeligt, Reginald Vandenberg. Eternal rest grant unto them O Lord, let your perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. AMEN.


We pray for those who are sick including Keith Brooks,  David Gudgeon, Angel Tan, Calvin Furnell, Richard Pereira, Val Battams Tom Cervasio, Marie Stephen, Deonetta Golja.  We pray for all who care for the sick and worry about them. May their works of service be richly blessed.  (Names can only be placed on this list by the sick person or a family member).


Click here to view the standard Bulletin (PDF)


BAPTISMS:

This weekend we welcome Jacob Roch for Baptism. “Receive the light of Christ. Parents and Godparents this light is entrusted to you to keep burning brightly” (Rite of Baptism). The next Baptism Preparation session is February 4th,  2018  at  2.45pm

Read more

Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment – 2018 Part 1

Last week in the bulletin (7 Jan 2018) we included part of a report of a survey offered to young Catholics last year to help prepare an Australian response to the forthcoming Synod of the Church, discussing the above topic. Following is another extract from that response, following on from last week:

THE IMPACT ON YOUNG PEOPLE: Along with the changes in the religious landscape, the Church’s significance as the centre of local community life has declined at the same time as people’s mobility and reliance on electronic forms of communication has increased. Young people are faced with a rising level of secularisation and materialism in the Australian society. Social media and main-stream media influences often conflict with the teachings of the faith. In addition, the Church’s teachings seem increasingly irrelevant to contemporary forms of relationships and do not support an individualistic way of working and living, so that the importance of religion has greatly decreased in many people’s lives. One of the challenges is also the variety of approaches to faith and church practice. On the one hand, there are those who adhere to traditional devotional, liturgical and hierarchical styles. On the other hand, there are those who place more emphasis on being Catholic within the world, in dialogue with others.

Rural dioceses face unique challenges in their ministry to young people. Going to Mass and attending youth groups is not very easy due to the large distances, the absence of regular weekend Mass and a lack of parish resources. The movement of young people to larger towns and cities sometimes creates a changed relationship with the Church and community. The Church can sometimes be seen as part of their childhood and not part of their daily life as they move to a new location and commence as adults. Individuals often return to their home parish for special moments such as a child’s baptism or a funeral but, due to the separation from the faith community of their childhood, they cease to engage in Church and have an ongoing faith life.

There are also challenges in ministering to migrant youth, with differently tailored youth programs needed for those who are born in Australia and new arrivals from overseas. These two groups of young people are distinct in their mentality, needs and also their choice of spoken language. For example, in the Chaldean diocese, some youth still speak only Chaldean and Arabic and struggle with English. This makes it a challenge to have an event that suits everyone. Indigenous Australians also face greater challenges with issues of equality and a lack of educational and work opportunities.

 Additional challenges for young people, as identified by both young people and the wider Church, include the breakdown of family relationships and an increase in domestic violence; the negative effects of social media (including cyberbullying, the need for constant connection and the resulting rewiring of how young people now think) and a lack of self-esteem and concern about what the future may hold for them. Another challenge is the over sexualisation of entertainment, advertising and media. This exposure to explicate concepts normalises the use of pornography, which leads to many different social challenges.

 Finally, the recent Royal Commission inquiry into the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church in Australia has had serious repercussions in many communities. The legacy of child sexual abuse in some dioceses has tarnished not only the institution of the Church but also anyone who remains an active member of its community. There is a general loss of trust in society’s institutions and leaders, including the Church. In some places, priests refrain from visiting schools as they used to. There is a perception that the Church has lost the moral high ground.

Sections Two and Three of this report provide further details on the challenges faced by young people and the responses provided by vocational programs, pastoral care workers and youth ministries in Australia.  

Parishioners might be interested to read more of this report on the Australian Catholic Bishops’ website: https://www.catholic.org.au/youthsurvey

 

 

The Catholic Community in the Australian Religious Landscape

The Australian religious landscape has constantly changed over the centuries. Prior to 1788, an Aboriginal spirituality, expressed in myth, ritual and way of life, prevailed. Most of Australia’s religious groups trace their origins to Ireland, the United Kingdom and Europe, with Catholics and Protestants being the main religious groups in the early years of European settlement. Over the years however, large surges in the immigration of people especially from non-English speaking countries, have led to an increase in non-Christian religious groups, and a greater diversity of religious affiliations than in previous times. Added to these changes is a rejection of religion by a large and growing number of Australians. Research findings from the 2009 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes suggest that for almost half of Australians, religion or spirituality is so weak that it is not present at all. 

The demographical profile of the Catholic community in Australia is increasingly multicultural with 23.6 per cent of the Australian Catholic population born overseas. An additional 22 per cent are second generation immigrants. While the Catholic population continues to increase, vocations to religious life (and even marriage) are on the decline. The number of Catholic religious in Australia shows a downward trend. In 2009 there were 8,422 Catholic religious in Australia as compared to 17,029 in 1976. The median age of Catholic religious was 73 as compared to 46 in 2006, confirming a rapidly aging profile. While these figures do not include diocesan clergy, Australia still has a relatively older religious community ministering to a younger Catholic population.

CATHOLIC PARISHES: There are currently 1,364 Catholic parishes operating in twenty-eight dioceses based on territorial divisions, five dioceses of Eastern Catholic churches and three other non-geographical dioceses which include the Military Ordinariate for the Armed Services of Australia, the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of the Southern Cross and the Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei.

Australian parishes and dioceses are very diverse in terms of their location, size and population demographics. The average number of Catholics per parish doubled between 1947 and 2006, 2006, from 1,735 to 3,729. Nevertheless, this population is unevenly spread across the country resulting in some very large parishes and other very small ones. Burleigh Heads in the Archdiocese of Brisbane is the largest parish, with over 32,000 Catholics. In comparison the smallest mainland parish of Jugiong in the Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn has only 86 Catholics. The percentage of the Catholic population in each parish in comparison to the total population of the area also varies greatly. In parishes such as Bathurst Island and Santa Teresa in the Diocese of Darwin, both of which are Aboriginal communities, Catholics make up 86 to 89 per cent of the population, while a few parishes in the dioceses of Geraldton, Darwin, and Cairns exist in communities that are under 10 per cent Catholic

Recent research has shown that vibrant parishes are those that are inclusive and welcoming, with committed parishioners, active parish groups and a strong sense of belonging and community. Rural parishes face greater challenges due to the declining number of priests and lay leaders for ministry, shrinking Catholic populations and a lack of adequate resources to support Mass and other parish ministries.  Despite this, some rural parishes continue to excel through innovative leadership structures and parish events, dynamic youth activities, strong community engagement and adaptability, planning and vision.

Parishioners might be interested to read more of this report on the Australian Catholic Bishops’ website: www.catholic.org.au